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  Diet Review
 





Diet Evolution
Eat Great, Lose Weight
Eating Thin for Life
Enter the Zone
Idiot's Guide
Sugar Busters!
The Atkins Diet
The Balancing Act
Total Health Makeover
Volumetrics


Charles Hunt's Diet Evolution
by Charles Hunt

THE GOOD: Hunt's "How To" Summary includes physical activity and drinking plenty of "pure" water (although this allows coffee, tea, and cream). Raw or steamed non-starchy vegetables are encouraged, fats are not completely unlimited, and the suggested cooking methods seem right on target - bake, grill, broil, stir-fry or poach. An attraction for many dieters may be no counting calories or fat grams, no weighing or measuring food, and no diet diary. Self-motivators are in place (progress photos and tracking compliance on a calendar), and beginners can start their strength program at home by following the example photos.

THE BAD: The golden rule of this diet is to eat only from the Diet Evolution Basic Foods list, which completely eliminates grains and starchy vegetables and includes several highly saturated fats. "Wrong foods" supposedly cause body malfunctions, while "good foods" maximize genetic potential. (These scenarios are generally red flags for unsound diet plans.) The reasoning behind some specific restrictions is questionable. For instance, peanuts are not allowed because they are "too high in carbohydrates." But cashews and pistachios (which actually have a higher percentage of calories from carbohydrates than peanuts) are recommended.

THE UGLY: The initial motive is to scare readers into changing their ways, and there are several pages of choice conclusions from vague studies to support the author's theory. Hunt believes that eating grains interferes with nutrient absorption, which makes it necessary to take vitamin supplements. Based on this statement, the reader would assume that eliminating grains from the diet would eliminate the need for supplements, but Hunt recommends four dietary supplements in his low-carbohydrate diet plan. There is mention of "modern" and "evolutionary" carbohydrates (huh?) and the frequently asked questions are answered with poorly supported explanations and simple opinions.

 
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